THEMP Discussion Papers

This page presents Discussion Papers as follows:

  • 3x Discussion papers for WP2,
  • 1x Discussion Paper for WP3,
  • 8x Discussion Papers for WP4,
  • 1x Discussion Paper for WP5,
  • 1x Discussion Paper for WP6,
  • 7x Discussion Paper for WP7.

Discussion papers - WP2

Discussion paper - WP2 - no.1
Social Vulnerability Management by Transitional Labour Markets
Authors: Karsten Krüger, Nestor Duch, Montse Álvarez (Foundation CYD)
THEMP analysed the social efficiency of tertiary lifelong learning. The first step of the conceptual development the project starts with a reflection about the Transitional Labour Market approach (TLM) to manage new and old social risks. The objective is to define the role of tertiary education at Universities to avoid, cope with and mitigate social risks. The TLM approach appeared at the end of the 1990’s and the beginning of the 2000’s offering a different concept to design new political labour market strategies. It takes into account the changing societal context in the European Societies, which are linked to a higher degree of uncertainties and complexity of the labour market. Taking social risks as point of departure, the TLM approach outlines a strategic proposal to design labour market policies. This approach allows stressing the potential role of tertiary adult education in social risk management underpinning some weaknesses of the TLM approach to measure the social efficiency of lifelong learning policies.

Discussion paper - WP2 - no.2
Quality of work and life in Social Vulnerability Management
Authors: Karsten Krüger, Nestor Duch, Montse Álvarez (Foundation CYD)
Starting from gaps in the Transitional Labour market approach to measure social efficiency of policies and measures, the paper takes up the discussion of social justice. In particular the capability approach developed by A. Sen, is considered appropriate to measure the social efficiency of education and training measures especially in the field of higher education. It allows to fine tuning the analysis of the risk situation and the possible solutions, providinig references to measure the social efficiency of tertiary adult education in terms of quality of work and life. The paper provides an outline of the main proposal to measure quality of work and life and develops an scheme to measure the social efficiency of lifelong learning programmes beyond employability.

Discussion paper - WP2 - no.3
Capitals as resources in the labour markets
Authors: Karsten Krüger, Nestor Duch, Montse Alvaréz (Foundation CYD)
Two previous discussion papers provided concepts to analyse the role of the tertiary adult education in the social risk management and to measure its social efficiency. But there are also weaknesses detected concerning the concept of labour markets and how learning results are converted in new sets of capability. Starting from a critic revision of the market concept of the Transitional Labour Market approach, this paper proposes to enrich it with elements of the capital approach contrasting the thoughts of Bourdieu (1982 and 1985) and Becker (1962) making a distinction between human, cultural and social capital. The outcomes of the tertiary adult education must be converted to capital with value in the labour markets. It is considered that the labour markets are specific social fields, in which the combination of different types of capital determines the labour position of the citizens and their opportunity to achieve desired levels of quality and quantity of work. So far, the results of the learning process in tertiary adult education must be converted to labour market relevant capital allowing the citizens to achieve new states of capabilities. Under the labour market perspective, the outlined broad capital approach allows to measure the social efficiency of institutional measures to support labour market transitions asking for the convertibility of human, cultural and social resources in capital in different labour market segments. Taking up the metaphor of capital as resources in the economic field: labour market conduced to the consideration that the labour market is considered here not as an aim by itself but as a mean for the individuals to achieve quality of life. In other words, the ultimate objective is not to bring the people back into the labour market or to maintain them in the labour market, but to facilitate resources so that they can achieve the quality of life that they want to achieve.

Discussion paper - WP3
Methods, Tools and Instruments
Author: Michele Mariani
THEMP focuses on the specific life stage of people older than 45 asking how TLL can contribute to prevent and mitigate the risk of social exclusion along labour market transitions of this age cohort. This report is compiled to define the methods and tools to be used for collecting data on the measures taken by Universities to expand their educational and training activities beyond traditional students to a wider range of citizens, with a focus on the age cohort of 45+ (mid-life learners). The data collection is instrumental to perform the two specific analyses on the issues of social inclusion and learning and teaching approaches used in TLL. Both analyses have a comparative nature: a cluster of different EU-wide TLL University Programmes are selected, studied and compared with the primary aim to detect which are the core conditions for the inclusion of mid-life learners in HE. This report defines the methods and tools to implement the Multiple-Case Study research strategy which compares different HE TLL programmes across a cluster of EU Universities.

Discussion papers - WP4

Discussion paper - WP4 - no.1
Mapping European Tertiary Lifelong Learning Landscapes of 7 European Countries
Authors: Csaba Makó – Péter Csizmadia – Miklós Illéssy (Institute of Sociology, Centre for Social Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)
The core aim of this report is providing a comparative analysis of the institutional environment of Tertiary Life-long Learning (TLL) in the countries participating in the THEMP project, focusing on both, differences and similarities. In order to do so, first a short account on the international institutional comparative studies is provided making a distinction between dichotomous and multidimensional approaches as two main strands of the literature analysing various socio-economic models in Europe.
After reviewing the main differences and similarities, for the comparative analysis we used the model typology elaborated by Sapir (2005), where the author measuring both “social” (i.e., equity) and “economic” (i.e., efficiency) performances of the various models of capitalism, makes a distinction between Continental, Nordic, Mediterranean and Anglo-Saxon social models, in which the post-socialist countries under scrutiny Czech Republic and Hungary could be included.
Identifying labour market, skill formation systems and labour market demand as main fields to describe these institutional settings, the paper present the analysis of the available statistical data on the key institutional factors that shape the practice of TLL in the countries investigated. This allows to make an abstract of the national description of the TLL systems under the header of institutional environment, policies and initiatives, and the funding.

Discussion paper - WP4 - no.2
Mapping the Czech Landscape of Tertiary Lifelong Learning
Author: Navreme Boheme, s.r.o.
The report describes the Czech landscape of tertiary adult education providing insights about the history of adult education, its institutional environment, current policies and financial aspects of the system.

Discussion paper - WP4 - no.3
Mapping the German Landscape of Tertiary Lifelong Learning
Author: Institut für Arbeit und Technik
The report describes the German landscape of tertiary adult education providing insights about the history of adult education, its institutional environment, current policies and financial aspects of the system

Discussion paper - WP4 - no.4
Mapping the Hungarian Landscape of Tertiary Lifelong Learning
Author: Csaba Makó – Péter Csizmadia – Miklós Illéssy (Institute of Sociology, Centre for Social Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)
The report describes the Hungarian landscape of tertiary adult education providing insights about the history of adult education, its institutional environment, current policies and financial aspects of the system

Discussion paper - WP4 - no.5
Mapping the Italian Landscape of Tertiary Lifelong Learning
Author: Michele Mariani (Department Communication and Economics - University of Modena and Reggio Emilia)
The report describes the Italian landscape of tertiary adult education providing insights about the history of adult education, its institutional environment, current policies and financial aspects of the system

Discussion paper - WP4 - no.6
Mapping the Dutch Landscape of Tertiary Lifelong Learning
Author: Erik Kats, Jaap van Lakerveld, Joost de Zoete (Plato- University Leiden)
The report describes the Dutch l landscape of tertiary adult education providing insights about the history of adult education, its institutional environment, current policies and financial aspects of the system

Discussion paper - WP4 - no.7
Mapping the Spanish Landscape of Tertiary Lifelong Learning
Author: Montse Álvarez, Nestor Duch, Karsten Krüger (all Foundation CYD), Laureano Jiménez, Alba Molas (both University Rovira I Virgili)
The report describes the Spanish landscape of tertiary adult education providing insights about the history of adult education, its institutional environment, current policies and financial aspects of the system

Discussion paper - WP4 - no.8
Mapping the UK Landscape of Tertiary Lifelong Learning
Author: Michael Osborne (CRADALL - University of Glasgow)
The report describes the UK landscape of tertiary adult education providing insights about the history of adult education, its institutional environment, current policies and financial aspects of the system

Discussion paper - WP5 - Synthesis Report: Social Inclusion of Mid-Life Learners through University Lifelong learning
The European Project THEMP (Tertiary Education for People in Midlife) focuses on the education and training mission of the universities and asks for the measures taken by them to expand their educational and training activities beyond the traditional students to a wider range of citizens and in wider range of learning environments (an objective sometimes labelled as HE's 'third mission'). Lifelong learning may contribute to the continuing professional development of employees and to an enduring utilization of their expertise in organisations. Thus it may help to prevent that people in midlife drop out from employment or that their careers come to a deadlock.
Based on case studies with the selected HE-institutions in seven European countries, this synthesis report gives in a comparative way an overview and some insights for the general Tertiary Lifelong Learning-activities which would support capacity building and social inclusion of midlife learners. Main focus lies in the analysis of the weak and strong points of the lifelong learning activities in the selected institutions and their strategies in developing and implementing training programs for the mid-life learners. Such training activities can support the building of own capacities to cope with requirements of changing labour market. Furthermore, they can contribute to new orientation and reintegration of participants to the labour market and, hence, increase their employability.

Discussion paper - WP6 - Synthesis Report: Teaching and Learning in University Lifelong Learning for People in Mid-Life
The purpose of this report is to focus specifically on the research questions aligned to teaching and learning (Didactics) of WP6. We first begin by providing a review of the relevant literature on teaching and learning approaches. These perspectives contribute in distinctly different ways to the way in which we specify learning outcomes, design learning environments and teaching methods, and create associated assessment. In a later section, we apply conceptual framework to our case studies. This is followed by a summary of the relevant theoretical literature which underpins the THE-MP project; and the contextual framework at both national and EU levels within which both the project and report are situated.
Section 4 introduces our analysis of Tertiary Lifelong Learning (TLL) and Mid-Life-Learners in Partner-Countries and includes summaries of relevant developments in higher education systems for each partner country. This is followed in Section 5 by our comparative analysis of the selected case study programmes guided by the conceptual framework introduced in Section 1. Similarities and differences are reported in relation to pedagogical approaches and organisational elements of the programmes. The results are summarised and while elements of good practice are identified, a number of possible barriers to increased access and participation are also noted. In the light of the analysis we then present some concluding thoughts on future developments in tertiary lifelong learning for adult learners in Europe.

Discussion papers - WP7 - National Comparative Reports

Discussion paper - WP7 - no.1
Spanin Comparative Report
Author: Karsten Krüger (Foundation CYD), Laureano Jiménez, Alba Molas, Javier Garcia (all University Rovira I Virgili)

Discussion paper - WP7 - no.2
The Netherlands Comparative Report
Author: Erik Kats, Jaap van Lakerveld (Plato- University Leiden)

Discussion paper - WP7 - no.3
Italy Comparative Report
Author: Michele Mariani, Antonella Epifanio (both Department Communication and Economics - University of Modena and Reggio Emilia)

Discussion paper - WP7 - no.4
Czech Republic Comparative Report
Author: Jaromír Mazák (Navreme Boheme, s.r.o.)

Discussion paper - WP7 - no.5
Hungary Comparative Report
Authors: Csaba Makó, Péter Csizmadia, Miklós Illéssy (all Institute of Sociology, Centre for Social Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

Discussion paper - WP7 - no.6
United Kingdom Comparative Report
Author: Muir Huston & Mike Osborne (CRADALL - University of Glasgow)

Discussion paper - WP7 - no.7
Germany Comparative Report
Author: Fikret Öz & Ileana Hamburg (both Institut für Arbeit und Technik)

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